English (ENG) (ENGL)

ENG 305. Children's Literature I. 3 Hours.

This course provides a survey of the history of children's books, books for very young children, picture books and illustrators, short fiction, folk tales, fables, myths and epics, historical fiction and biography.

ENG 306. Young Adult Literature. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of young adult literature.

ENG 312. Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of the author's plays with special attention devoted to major and better-known works.

ENG 320. Understanding Grammar. 3 Hours.

This course engenders improved application and understanding of English grammar by using traditional sentence diagramming to review fundamental principles of grammar and mechanics.

ENG 340. Advanced Expository Writing (EL). 3 Hours.

This course advances individual writing ability by focusing upon analytical and rhetorical strategies through various exercises and the production of compositions. This course integrates the principles of Experiential Learning and meets criteria for undergraduate research. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 with a grade of C or better.

ENG 345. Advanced Composition for Educators. 3 Hours.

This course provides future educators opportunities to grow as writers, personally and professionally, through interaction with the conventions of writing, literature, and writing across the curriculum, all within a writing community focused on education of self and others. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 with a grade of C or better.

ENG 350. Technical Writing. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes the principles of composition, document design, and rhetoric applied to primary genres within scientific, technical, and professional writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 with a grade of C or better.

ENG 424. History and Grammar of the English Language. 3 Hours.

Participants will cover topics that include the basic features of human language, a historical study of English, and a study of English phonology, morphology, and syntax.

ENG 430. Studies in Women's Literature. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of the various images of women in literature with an emphasis on the twentieth century.

ENG 442. Advanced American Literature. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of specific eras of American Literature. Topics will vary.

ENG 445. Advanced World Literature. 3 Hours.

This advanced course in World Literature aims to introduce students to a selection of classic and/or modern literary works outside of the United States and Britain. One of the goals of the course is to analyze and discuss these works of literature within their soci-historical context with an emphasis upon a different theme or literary movement presented in each offering of the course. While this varying theme or movement will demarcate the frame of the course, the theme of encounters (textual and cultural) remains consistent and the importance of factors such as race, class, gender, religion, language, translation, and so on will be taken into consideration. The students' critical engagement with the assigned works of literature will be further enhanced by the historical and literary background provided by lectures and secondary sources. No prior knowledge of or familiarity with other languages is required as all reading materials are provided in English translation.

ENG 450. Studies in Genre. 3 Hours.

This course provides an advanced study of one of the following literary genres: Short Story, Film, Poetry, Drama, and International Literature. It may be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 472. Advanced British Literature. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of specific eras of British Literature. Topics will vary.

ENG 489. Individual Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENG 491. Capstone in English Studies. 1 Hour.

This course constitutes a practicum in which students review English studies with emphasis on critical approaches to literature, literary terminology, and the characteristics and major writers of literary periods. Students write capstone papers that reflect their understanding of the components of literary study. Prerequisite: To be taken during the final semester of the bachelor's degree program in English.

ENG 497. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Instructors will provide an organized class designed to cover areas of specific interest. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENG 518. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

A master's thesis is the written result of a thorough and systematic study of a significant issue. The thesis identifies the issue, tackles significant assumptions in a critical field, explains the contribution to the field, and offers a conclusion. The finished product is original, documents critical and independent thinking, appropriate organization and format, and thorough documentation. An oral defense of the thesis is required. NOTE: Students may take no more than 6 semester credit hours in Thesis.

ENG 555. Linguistics. 3 Hours.

This course offers an introduction to principles of how language develops, changes and functions. The course focuses on the differences among world languages, the history of the English language, and analysis of modern English phonology, morphology and syntax (sound, units of meaning, word order).

ENG 565. Grant and Proposal Writing. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the grant writing and proposal writing processes, especially as they pertain to literacy funding opportunities at the K-12 levels. Students will learn the discourse of grant writing, research funding sources, navigate the conventions of the genre, and practice how to address these rhetorical situations effectively.

ENG 570. Strategies in Composition. 3 Hours.

Reading recent studies of the composing process, students evaluate strategies for teaching composition, including remedial and creative writing. In addition, each student researches an area of special interest within the field of composition studies, writes a review of this research, and presents a summary of finding in an oral presentation to the class. Cross listed with ED 570. Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required. Corequisite: ENG 571.

ENG 571. Improving Students' Writing in the Schools. 3 Hours.

Students analyze current research in composition and writing across the curriculum, with special emphasis upon the theoretical approach developed by the National Writing Project. Further, after researching an area of special interest, each student applies theoretical principles by developing a unit of instruction and presenting a demonstration lesson. Cross listed with ED 571. Prerequisite: Instructor permission is required. Corequisite: ENG 570.

ENG 572. Readings in Composition. 3 Hours.

This course offers students the opportunity to explore a wide range of theoretical composition strategies and help them formulate praxis for their own teaching of composition and/or their own writing.

ENG 573. Graduate Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

This course promotes the development of creative writing skills by introducing advanced concepts and exercises for writing creative nonfiction, poems, plays, and short stories.

ENG 575. Current Issues in English Studies: Graduate Capstone. 3 Hours.

This course constitutes a practicum in which students conduct an in-depth study of topics in English language, literature, or composition through traditional or applied research. Students write two capstone papers on approved topics that are appropriate for submitting to academic journals.

ENG 580. Seminar in Literature. 3 Hours.

This course offers an examination of an individual author or group of authors, the study of a literary theme, or the study of a particular genre. It may be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 589. Individual Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENG 590. Seminar in Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

This course examines one or more theoretical or historical movements in, philosophical approaches to, and/or applications of rhetoric. Course may be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 591. Seminar in Composition Studies. 3 Hours.

This course examines the theoretical/historical movements in, philosophical/empirical approaches to, or applications of practices within fields relevant to composition studies. Course may be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 593. Research in Composition. 3 Hours.

Through exposure to contemporary empirical (quantitative and qualitative) research in composition studies--including the subfields of writing center studies, Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL), writing across the curriculum (WAC), and writing in the disciplines (WID)--students will learn proper development of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research methodologies in composition.

ENG 595. Research Literature and Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course offers a review of research by scholars in selected areas of English language and literature with emphasis on critical approaches and research methodology. Students will demonstrate competence in research methodology by the investigation and formal reporting of a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. This coruse is equivalent to IS 595 for English majors.

ENG 597. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Instructors will provide an organized class designed to cover areas of specific interest. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENGL 089. Independent Study in Developmental Writing. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENGL 1101. Information Literacy. 1 Hour.

This course covers the basic concepts and skills of information literacy, the research process, critical thinking skills, and ethical aspects of information. Students are introduced to characteristics, formats, and organization of information, and are provided with practical experience in the use of the academic library. Course content also introduces electronic resources such as journal databases, search engines, and directories.

ENGL 1111. Popular Music as Literature. 1 Hour.

Popular Music as Literature offers students an introduction to literary study through the vehicle of popular music. Literary terminology and forms are considered within the context of pop music. It requires students to read closely and critically and become sensitive to the nuances of language.

ENGL 1301. Composition I. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis is on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus is on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

ENGL 1302. Composition II. 3 Hours.

This course builds on those skills developed in ENGL 1301 and assumes a satisfactory level of student competency in composition. This course focuses on intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 with a C or better.

ENGL 189. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENGL 2321. British Literature. 3 Hours.

This course serves as an introductory survey of the major authors in English literature from the Old English period to the present. It includes a variety of genres and considers the works as intellectual, cultural, aesthetic creations. It requires students to apply interpretive skills in writing about pieces of literature and to be aware of the traditional literary periods. English majors and non-English majors may take this course, which satisfies the core-curriculum requirement for three lower-division semester credit hours in Creative Arts.

ENGL 2326. American Literature. 3 Hours.

This course examines representative works of American Literature from pre-colonial times to the contemporary period using historical, philosophical, and structural filters to investigate universal social themes. There are no prerequisites for this course. English majors and non-English majors may take this course, which satisfies the core-curriculum requirement for three lower-division semester credit hours in Creative Arts.

ENGL 2331. World Literature. 3 Hours.

World Literature is a survey of some of the major works of literature across the world from early civilizations to present, focusing on major periods. Students who take this course will increase their awareness of historical cultures; sharpen their critical reading, thinking, and writing skills; and deepen their cultural sensitivity. English majors and non-English majors may take this course, which satisfies the core-curriculum requirement for three lower-division semester credit hours in Creative Arts.

ENGL 2340. Writing Across the Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This course helps students understand and develop their writing, reading, and thinking skills across the disciplines through the creation and rhetorical study of personal and scholarly texts. It includes a focus on the principles and techniques of written expository and persuasive texts and critical thinking across the curriculum.

ENGL 2351. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

This course promotes the development of creative writing skills by introducing and applying core concepts for writing creative non-fiction, poems, scripts, and short stories.

ENGL 2360. Introduction to Literary Studies. 3 Hours.

This course is an examination of the fundamental principles of literary study with special attention to critical approaches to language and literature, bibliography and research, and writing in the discipline. As an introduction to literary study designed for English majors, this course stresses proper literary terminology, literary theory, and analytical writing; the tools of a successful English major.

ENGL 289. Independent Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.