Chemistry 7-12 Chemistry Certification

Teacher Preparation Program Admission Requirements

Apply 3rd Year, 1st Semester

  1. Application to Teacher Prep Program via TK20 in September or February
  2. GPA requirement of 2.8 cumulative
  3. Completion of  ED 311,  ED 321 and SPED 410 with grade C or above
  4. Completion of 15 hours in Content Area with no grade below C
  5. THEA IBT scores of Reading 240, Math 230, Writing 220

Chemistry w/7-12 Chemistry Teacher Certification Degree Requirements

Students should refer to their DegreeWorks degree audit in their Web for Students account for more information regarding their degree requirements. 

Major Requirements
General Education Requirements
CHEM 1311General Chemistry I3
CHEM 1111General Chemistry I (Lab)1
CHEM 1312General Chemistry II3
CHEM 1112General Chemistry II (Lab)1
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
CHEM 2425Organic Chemistry II4
CHEM 340Quantitative Chemical and Instrumental Analysis4
CHEM 410Biochemistry I4
CHEM 351Physical Chemistry I4
CHEM 321Inorganic Chemistry4
CHEM 497Special Topics in Chemistry1-4
MATH 2413Calculus I 14
PHYS 2325University Physics I3
PHYS 2125University Physics I Lab1
PHYS 2326University Physics II3
PHYS 2126University Physics II Lab1
Other Requirements
BIOL 1306Biology for Science Majors I 13
BIOL 1106Biology for Science Majors I Lab 11
BIOL 1307Biology for Science Majors II 13
BIOL 1107Biology for Science Majors II Lab 11
ITED 350Technologies for Instruction, Learning, and Communication3
RDG 343Reading Beyond the Primary Grades3
Professional Development
ED 311Growth and Development for EC to Grade 12 (EL)3
ED 321Foundations of Education (EL)3
ED 435Secondary Content Pedagogy 23
SPED 410Introduction to Individual with Exceptionalities 23
Block 1:
ED 331Classroom and Behavior Management 33
ED 495Block 1 - Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates (EL) 33
Block 2:
ED 496Block 2 - Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates (EL) 43
SPED 418Research, Trends, and Issues in Education 43
Electives (As needed to satisfy minimum degree requirements and 54 semester credit hours of Upper Division Coursework)
Minimum Grade of "C" in all Major, Ed, Sped and Professional Development Courses
Minimum Hours for Degree120
1

 Satisfies Core Curriculum

2

 Requires Admission to Teacher Prep Program

3

 Requires successful placement interview with a partnership public school district

4

 Requires passing all TExES exams

Note: A minimum of 54 upper division hours (300 and 400 level courses) are required for this degree. Resident credit totaling 25% of the hours is required for the degree.  A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in three areas for graduation:  Overall GPA, Institutional GPA, and Major GPA.

Courses in Chemistry  w/7-12 Teacher Certification

CHEM 1311. General Chemistry I. 3 Hours.

This course covers the fundamental principles of chemistry. This course is the first of two general chemistry courses offered sequentially for majors in biological, health, and physical sciences. Topics include measurements, fundamental properties of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, chemical stoichiometry, periodocity of elemental properties, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, solutions, properties of gases, and an introduction to thermodynamics and descriptive chemistry. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or MATH 2412. Corequisite: CHEM 1111.

CHEM 1111. General Chemistry I (Lab). 1 Hour.

This course introduces students to basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in CHEM 1311. The course introduces the scientific method, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Corequisite: CHEM 1311.

CHEM 1312. General Chemistry II. 3 Hours.

This course is the second course of the general chemistry sequence. Topics include chemical equilibrium, phase diagrams and specrometry, acid-base concepts, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1111 and CHEM 1311. Corequisite: CHEM 1112.

CHEM 1112. General Chemistry II (Lab). 1 Hour.

This course introduces students to basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in CHEM 1312. Students will be introduced to the use of the scientific method in experimental design, chemical instrumentation, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Prerequisite: CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1312.

CHEM 2423. Organic Chemistry I. 4 Hours.

This course is the first of a comprehensive and somewhat rigorous survey of organic chemistry emphasizing nomenclature, structure, properties, synthesis, and reaction mechanisms of carbon compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 1312 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 2425. Organic Chemistry II. 4 Hours.

This course is the second semester of Organic Chemistry sequence emphasizing the classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds that contain oxygen and nitrogen. Prerequisite: CHEM 2423.

CHEM 340. Quantitative Chemical and Instrumental Analysis. 4 Hours.

This course covers fundamental theory and techniques in traditional chemical analysis. Topics include sampling and separation methods, measurements, statistics, equilibrium and pH studies, gravimetric and combustion analysis, electrochemical techniques, and introduction to instrumentation. Biology minors in Environmental Science require this course. Prerequisite: CHEM 1312 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 410. Biochemistry I. 4 Hours.

Biochemistry I is the first semester of a one-year course. The first semester covers the structures and functions of amino acids, proteins, and simple and complex carbohydrates. This course also covers carbohydrate metabolism, including glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and signal cascades in carbohydrate metabolism. The course emphasizes understanding biochemistry from a biological point of view and on providing information on how biochemical events are regulated in living tissues. Prerequisite: CHEM 2423 and CHEM 2425 with a C or better in both courses.

CHEM 351. Physical Chemistry I. 4 Hours.

This course is an introduction to quantum mechanics, solvable model problems, chemical kinetics, rigorous treatments of the first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics, as well as applications to gases (both ideal and real), liquids, solutions, and phase equilibria. Prerequisite: MATH 2413, PHYS 2325, and PHYS 2326.

CHEM 321. Inorganic Chemistry. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on descriptive inorganic chemistry. It covers bonding theories, redox chemistry, properties of main group and transition metals, ligand field theory, molecular magnetism, and electronic spectra in transition metal complexes. Prerequisites: CHEM 1111, CHEM 1112, CHEM 1311, and CHEM 1312.

CHEM 497. Special Topics in Chemistry. 1-4 Hours.

This course provides instruction on special topics in an identified area of chemistry. Students may repeat the course for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 1306. Biology for Science Majors I. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes the chemistry of life, the cell, genetics, and mechanisms of evolution. Corequisite: BIOL 1106.

BIOL 1106. Biology for Science Majors I Lab. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with hands-on exploration in the biological sciences. Content includes the process of scientific inquiry, important concepts in biochemistry and genetics, and introduction to laboratory techniques. Corequisite: BIOL 1306.

BIOL 1307. Biology for Science Majors II. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306. Corequisite: BIOL 1107.

BIOL 1107. Biology for Science Majors II Lab. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with hands-on exploration in the biological sciences. Content includes a survey of plants, animals, and microorganisms as well as studies of basic biological processes such as digestion, circulation, and nervous system function. Corequisite: BIOL 1307.

PHYS 2325. University Physics I. 3 Hours.

This course is a calculus based physics sequence for students in pre-professional programs, biology, geology, or architecture wo do not expect to do additional work in engineering or physics. Topics include elementary vector algebra, mechanics, heat, thermodynamics and sound. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 2413. Corequisite: PHYS 2125.

PHYS 2125. University Physics I Lab. 1 Hour.

Physics lab covers elementary vector algebra, mechanics, heat, thermodynamics and sound. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 2413. Corequisite: PHYS 2325.

PHYS 2326. University Physics II. 3 Hours.

This course is a calculus-based physics sequence for students in computer science and engineering programs. This course covers electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2325 or PHYS 2425. Corequisite: PHYS 2126.

PHYS 2126. University Physics II Lab. 1 Hour.

This lab covers electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 2413. Corequisite: PHYS 2326.

ED 311. Growth and Development for EC to Grade 12 (EL). 3 Hours.

This is an introductory education course which presents theories of children's growth and development along with their relationship to learning and teaching. Cultural, emotional, physical, intellectual, and learning differences are studied for their impact on learning and educational opportunity. Students must be considered in their junior year and will be required to participate in 8 hours of field experience. This course integrates the principles of Experiential Learning and meets the criteria of field work.

ED 321. Foundations of Education (EL). 3 Hours.

This introductory education course provides students knowledge and skills to 1) design instruction and assessment to promote student learning, 2) create a positive, productive classroom environment, 3) implement effective, responsive instruction and assessment, and 4) work effectively with ESL students in the regular education classroom. This course integrates the principles of Experiential Learning and meets the criteria for field work.

ED 331. Classroom and Behavior Management. 3 Hours.

This course presents best practices in classroom and behavior management including management of time, materials, and space. Additionally, the course examines strategies for managing individual and large-group student behaviors, transitions, lab activities, and other arrangements for classrooms in general and special education. Prerequisite: Admitted to the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 435. Secondary Content Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

This course provides students seeking certification in grades 4-8 and 7-12 with pedagogical best-practices. Students will learn lesson planning, assessment, and available resources for their specific content area. Methods for accessing and processing information through traditional as well as new technologies will be addressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 495. Block 1 - Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates (EL). 3 Hours.

This three semester credit hour course provides clinical work in the public school setting as part of field experience requirements for the undergraduate Teacher Preparation Program (TPP). University student is identified as Teacher Candidate and is required to spend six (6) hours per week for 12 weeks in an assigned classroom under the supervision of an Instructional Leadership Team (ILT). Block 1 is the first semester of the co-teaching assignment (2 semesters) in which Teacher Candidate and Cooperating Teacher are considered co-teachers for the class. This course integrates the principles of Experiential Learning and meets the criterion for internship. Prerequisite: Approved field-based assignment by the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 496. Block 2 - Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates (EL). 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical work in a public school setting as part of field experience requirements for the undergraduate Teacher Preparation Program (TPP). University student is identified as Teacher Candidate and is required to spend 72 full public school days in an assigned classroom under the supervision of an Instructional Leadership Team (ILT). Block 2 is the second semester of the co-teaching assignment (2 semesters) in which Teaching Candidate and Cooperating Teacher are considered co-teachers for the class. This course integrates the principles of Experiential Learning and meets the criterion for internship. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ED 495; passing scores on both TExES PPR and TExES Content exams appropriate for the level and certification being sought; continued acceptance in a public school classroom.

ITED 350. Technologies for Instruction, Learning, and Communication. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop a comfort with technology and its application to communication. Emphasis is placed on computer assisted presentations, software/hardware analysis, and the design and execution of instruction using electronic means. Previously offered as COMM 350.

MATH 2413. Calculus I. 4 Hours.

This course provides a rigorous study of the concepts and applications of limits and continuity; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; definition of the derivative of a function and techniques of differentiation; applications of the derivative to maximizing or minimizing a function; the chain rule, mean value theorem, and rate of change problems; curve sketching; definite and indefinite integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental function, with an application to calculation of areas. Appropriate computer software and hand held technologies will be utilized. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 and MATH 1316 with a C or better, or MATH 2412 with a C or better. Placement will also be determined by the Math Placement Exam score.

RDG 343. Reading Beyond the Primary Grades. 3 Hours.

This course teaches content area teachers how to help their students learn from textbooks, including techniques for evaluating both textbooks and students. Coping with the reading, demands of textbooks, and study skills will be learned.

SPED 410. Introduction to Individual with Exceptionalities. 3 Hours.

This course develops students’ foundational knowledge of historical perspectives, educational principles, laws, and professional ethics and roles in the fields of special education and English Language Learners (ELL). It focuses on the learning and behavioral characteristics of diverse learners, including students with exceptionalities (which includes disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders, Dyslexia, and Gifted/Talented) students who are ELL and students who are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional (CLDE) learners. Additionally, this course introduces instructional strategies, appropriate curriculum, accommodations, modifications, and assistive technology to ensure the success of all learners.

SPED 418. Research, Trends, and Issues in Education. 3 Hours.

This course presents current research, issues, and trends in education, specifically emphasizing the teaching-learning process to meet specific student learning needs. Emphasis is placed on teacher candidates integrating best practices in the teaching-learning process including: 1) Strength-based strategies, 2) Understanding by Design, 3) Differentiation, 4) Differentiation for Neurodiversity, 5) State Accountability Testing, and 6) Teacher Evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program.

Faculty

Dr. Greg Hogan

Assistant Professor

Email: ghogan@tamut.edu

Dr. Md Abul Kalam

Professor

Email: md.kalam@tamut.edu

Laura Currey

Instructor

Email: laura.currey@tamut.edu

Melba Foster

Instructor

Email: mfoster@tamut.edu

Dr. Teri Fowler

Associate Professor

Email: teri.fowler@tamut.edu

Katheryn  Hartshorn

Instructor

Email: khartshorn@tamut.edu

Dr. Sandra Labby

Assistant Professor

Email: slabby@tamut.edu

Dr. Sara Lawrence

Associate Professor

Email: sara.lawrence@tamut.edu

Dr. Judy Sander

Professor

Email: judy.sander@tamut.edu

Debora Shidemantle

Instructor

Email: debora.shidemantle@tamut.edu

Dr. Abbie Strunc

Assistant Professor

Email: astrunc@tamut.edu