History 4-8 Social Studies Certification

Teacher Preparation Program Admission Requirements

Apply 3rd Year, 1st Semester

  1. Application to Teacher Prep Program via TK20 in September or February
  2. GPA requirement of 2.8 cumulative
  3. Completion of  ED 311ED 321 and SPED 410  with grade C or above
  4. Completion of 12 hours in Content Area with no grade below C
  5. THEA IBT scores of Reading 240, Math 230, Writing 220

Degree Requirements for History Major w/4-8 Social Studies Teacher Certification

Students should refer to their DegreeWorks degree audit in their Web for Students account for more information regarding their degree requirements.

Major Requirements 6
General Education Requirements42
HIST 1301United States History I 73
HIST 1302United States History II 73
GOVT 2301American Government I: Federal & Texas Constitutions 73
GOVT 2302American Government II: Federal & Texas Political Behavior 73
ECON 2301Principles of Macroeconomics3
GEOG 1303World Regional Geography3
HIST 2321World Civilization I 7, 83
HIST 2322World Civilization II 7, 83
HIST 460Cultural History of Texas3
Upper Division Political Science Electives:6
Select nine semester credit hours Upper-division United States History from the following:9
Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1492-1789
Sex, Swords, & Sorcery: The Medieval World in Anglo-American Film
The United States in the Twentieth Century
The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877
American Social and Intellectual History
Select six semester credit hours Upper-division European History from the following:6
The Ancient World
Augustus Caesar to Charlemagne: Europe in the First Millennium
Medieval Civilization
Renaissance and Reformation
History of Nazi Germany
Europe, 1920 to the Present
The World of King Arthur and Robin Hood
Select six semester credit hours Upper-division World History from the following:6
Latin America-The Colonial Era
Modern Latin America
Voices of the Spanish Conquest in the Americas
The Culture and History of Mexico
Twentieth Century Asia
Other Requirements
BIOL 1308Biology for Non-Science Majors I 73
BIOL 1108Biology for Non-science Majors I Lab 71
BIOL 1309Biology for Non-Science Majors II 73
BIOL 1109Biology for Non-science Majors II Lab 71
ITED 350Technologies for Instruction, Learning, and Communication3
MATH 1350Fundamentals of Mathematics I3
MATH 1351Fundamentals of Math II3
PHYS 1415Physical Science I4
RDG 343Reading Beyond the Primary Grades3
RDG 350Emergent Literacy Development3
SPED 410Introduction to Individual with Exceptionalities 93
Professional Development
ED 311Growth and Development for Early Childhood to Grade 123
ED 321Foundations of Education3
ED 435Secondary Content Pedagogy 93
Block 1
ED 331Classroom and Behavior Management 103
ED 495Block 1: Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates 103
Student Teaching Semester
ED 496Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates 113
SPED 418Research, Trends, and Issues in Education 113
Minimum Hours for Degree121
6

Minimum grade of "C" required in all Major, Education and Professional Development Courses

7

Satisfies core curriculum

8

Language, Philosophy, Culture option

9

Requires Admission to Teacher Prep Program

10

Requires successful placement interview with a partnership public school district

11

Requires passing all TExES exams

Note: A minimum of 54 upper division hours (300 and 400 level courses) are required for this degree. Resident credit totaling 25% of the hours is required for the degree.  A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in three areas for graduation:  Overall GPA, Institutional GPA, and Major GPA.

Undergraduate courses in History 4-8 Social Studies Certification

ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Hours.

This course examines the economic behavior of the aggregate U.S. economy. Major topics include fundamental macroeconomic principles, national employment, prices, economic growth, business cycles, and monetary and fiscal stabilization.

ED 311. Growth and Development for Early Childhood to Grade 12. 3 Hours.

This course examines theories of children's growth and development along with relationships to learning and teaching. Cultural, emotional, physical, intellectual, and learning differences are studied. Prerequisite: None.

ED 321. Foundations of Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines theories of learning along with the impact of strategies for effective teaching. Educational measurement and evaluation as used by schools will be studied. Theories relevant to the use of media and technology will be addressed. Prerequisite: None.

ED 331. Classroom and Behavior Management. 3 Hours.

This course presents best practices in classroom and behavior management including management of time, materials, and space. Additionally, the course examines strategies for managing individual and large-group student behaviors, transitions, lab activities, and other arrangements for classrooms in general and special education. Prerequisite: Admitted to the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 435. Secondary Content Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

This course provides students seeking certification in grades 4-8 and 7-12 with pedagogical best-practices. Students will learn lesson planning, assessment, and available resources for their specific content area. Methods for accessing and processing information through traditional as well as new technologies will be addressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 495. Block 1: Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates. 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical work in the public school setting as part of field experience requirements for the undergraduate Teacher Preparation Program (TPP). University student is identified as Teacher Candidate and is required to spend 6 hours per week for 12 weeks in an assigned classroom under the supervision of an Instructional Leadership Team (ILT) to include University Field Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher. Block 1 is the first semester of the co-teaching assignment (2 semesters) in which Teacher Candidate and Cooperating Teacher are considered co-teachers for the class. Student is required to complete assignments, activities, projects, and observations as assigned by ILT. Prerequisite: Approved field-based assignment by the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 496. Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates. 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical work in the public school setting as part of field experience requirements for the undergraduate Teacher Preparation Program (TPP). University student is identified as Teacher Candidate and is required to spend 72 full public school days in an assigned classroom under the supervision of an Instructional Leadership Team (ILT) to include University Field Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher. Block 1 (prerequisite) is the first semester of the co-teaching assignment (2 semesters) in which Teacher Candidate and their Cooperating Teacher are considered co-teachers for the class in a public school setting in the grade level and content of the certification they are seeking. Student will complete assignments, activities, projects, and observations related to certification being sought as assigned by ILT. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ED 495; passing scores on both TExES PPR and TExES Content exams appropriate for the level and certification being sought; continued acceptance in a public school classroom.

GEOG 1303. World Regional Geography. 3 Hours.

Students study both the developed and developing regions of the world, with an emphasis on an awareness of prevailing conditions and emerging issues, including the diversity of ideas and practices in various regions. Major topics include culture, religion, language, landforms, climate, agriculture, and economic activities.

HIST 1111. Cathedrals, Castles, & Monasteries: Medieval Architecture and Engineering. 1 Hour.

This one-credit seminar introduces students to the fascinating and complicated world of medieval architecture and engineering.

HIST 1301. United States History I. 3 Hours.

This is a course that studies the historical development of the United States to 1877. Students will study the people, events, and ideas that influenced United States history in the Colonial, Revolutionary, Early National, Jacksonian, Civil War, and Reconstruction eras. Readings, lectures, and discussions will consider the American experience as a unique experiment in enlightened liberty and self-government.

HIST 1302. United States History II. 3 Hours.

This is a course on the historical development of the United States since 1877. Students will study the people, events, and ideas that influenced United States history in the Gilded Age, Progressive Era, Roaring Twenties, Great Depression, New Deal, Second World War, and Postwar Era. Readings, lectures, and discussions will consider the American experience as a unique experiment in enlightened liberty and self-government.

HIST 2321. World Civilization I. 3 Hours.

This course surveys world civilizations from the appearance of settled agricultural societies to the sixteenth century.

HIST 2322. World Civilization II. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the major political, cultural, economic, social, and intellectual developments from 1500 to the present.

HIST 310. The Ancient World. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of Mediterranean civilizations to the fall of the Roman Empire with emphasis on the histories of Greece and Rome.

HIST 311. Augustus Caesar to Charlemagne: Europe in the First Millennium. 3 Hours.

This course examines the history of Europe from the birth of the Roman Empire under Augustus Caesar to the creation of Charlemagne's Empire in the ninth century. Along the way, we will discover how the Romans and their Germanic neighbors shaped the realm that was to become "Europe" and laid the foundation for the creation of the medieval world. Topics covered will include the origins of Christianity and Islam, the development of the Christian church, the creation of European kingship, the evolution of a European aristocracy, and the collapse of the Mediterranean economy.

HIST 312. Medieval Civilization. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of the heritage of the Middle Ages, emphasizing the growth of political, social, economic, cultural, and religious institutions.

HIST 314. Renaissance and Reformation. 3 Hours.

This is a course devoted to the study of the nature and origin of the religious, social, economic, cultural and religious institutions.

HIST 328. Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1492-1789. 3 Hours.

This course examines the development of the British colonies in North America through the eighteenth century, the American Revolution, and the establishment of the institutional foundations of the new American Republic during the Confederation period.

HIST 330. History of Nazi Germany. 3 Hours.

This course examines the social, economic, and political forces that led to the rise of the Nazi Party in the 1920's, its seizure of power in the 1930's, and its downfall in the 1940's after initiating a devastating world war. Students will analyze why so many Germans were drawn to Adolf Hitler's leadership. The course will also examine other topics such as anti-Semitism, the collapse of democratic Weimar Republic, World War II, and the Holocaust.

HIST 350. The History of the Vietnam War through Narrative Film. 3 Hours.

This course studies America's involvement in the Vietnam War from the 1940's to the 1970's and the legacy of the war in Southeast Asia and in America to the 21st century. Participants will study these events through lectures and discussions and through narrative films that provide a historical perspective of the war.

HIST 352. Europe, 1920 to the Present. 3 Hours.

This course is an interpretation of the far-flung events and movements of European history since the First World War. Special emphasis is placed on the rise of Communism, Fascism, Nazism, the Second World War, the Cold War, and recent developments in European history.

HIST 416. Sex, Swords, & Sorcery: The Medieval World in Anglo-American Film. 3 Hours.

The Medieval World has been fascinating audiences of cinema since the earliest days of Hollywood. From figures such as King Arthur and Robin Hood to settings such as Camelot and England, film-makers have remade the Middle Ages to suit their own interests and ideals. This course allows students to view and analyze a number of films about the medieval period and medieval characters in order to better understand how and why we consistently re-imagine the Middle Ages.

HIST 419. American Social and Intellectual History. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of the social and intellectual currents and ideas that influence and inform the American people.

HIST 428. The United States in the Twentieth Century. 3 Hours.

This course develops an understanding of the various forces that influence contemporary society. The major themes of industrialization and international involvement provide the framework within which modern America emerges on the world scene.

HIST 434. The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877. 3 Hours.

This course examines the political, social, and constitutional origins of the American Civil War; military, political, and social history during the war years; and the reconstruction of the Southern States.

HIST 445. The World of King Arthur and Robin Hood. 3 Hours.

This course examines the history of the British Isles through two of its most popular figures- King Arthur and Robin Hood. Students will study the settings for each figure- the early medieval period for the “historical” Arthur, the high medieval period of the “literary” Arthur, and the late medieval period for Robin Hood.

HIST 450. Latin America-The Colonial Era. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of the social, economic, political, and religious forces that shaped Latin America through the independence movements of the nineteenth century.

HIST 451. Modern Latin America. 3 Hours.

This course will study the major historical developments of Latin America since the beginning of the nineteenth century and provide students with a general history of Latin America.

HIST 453. Voices of the Spanish Conquest in the Americas. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the Spanish conquests of the Americas fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Students will read a variety of primary documents and peer-reviewed texts to examine how Spanish conquests in the Americas shaped the social, economic, political, and religious development of Latin America.

HIST 454. The Culture and History of Mexico. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the major political, cultural, economic, social, and intellectual developments of Mexico from Pre-Columbian times to the present, and examines how Mexicans today interpret and celebrate their rich and diverse heritage.

HIST 460. Cultural History of Texas. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of the historical, political, and economic forces that have shaped the cultural identity of Texas from Native American prehistory through the Spanish conquest, republic independence, statehood, confederacy, and reconstruction to a major role in the emergence of the New South and the new economy.

HIST 462. Modern German History. 3 Hours.

This course examines the history of the German people from the unification process in the 19th century through dramatic history of war and reconstruction in the 20th century.

HIST 470. Twentieth Century Asia. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of major political, social, and cultural forces that have shaped the history of Asia in the Twentieth Century.

HIST 489. Individual Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

HIST 490. Internship. 3 Hours.

The history internship offers students an opportunity to work in the Texarkana Museum System. Students will participate in a variety of tasks which will provide them an introduction to museum and archival work. To enroll, students must be History or Education majors, have an overall grade point average of 2.75 or higher, and have completed 15 SCH of college history courses with a grade point average of 3.00 or higher. Only currently enrolled students who are seeking a degree may apply for the internship course.

HIST 497. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Instructors will provide an organized class designed to cover areas of specific interest. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ITED 350. Technologies for Instruction, Learning, and Communication. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop a comfort with technology and its application to communication. Emphasis is placed on computer assisted presentations, software/hardware analysis, and the design and execution of instruction using electronic means. Previously offered as COMM 350.

MATH 1350. Fundamentals of Mathematics I. 3 Hours.

This course provides a rigorous study of the concepts and applications of sets, functions, numeration systems, number theory, and properties of the natural numbers, integers, rational, and real number systems with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. This course is designed for students seeking EC-6 teacher certification. Appropriate computer software and hand held technologies will be utilized. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 with a C or better.

MATH 1351. Fundamentals of Math II. 3 Hours.

This course provides a rigorous study of the concepts and applications of geometry, probability, statistics, and measurement with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. This course is designed for students seeking EC-6 teacher certification. Appropriate computer software and hand held technologies will be utilized. Prerequisite: MATH 1350 and MATH 1314 with a C or better.

PHYS 1415. Physical Science I. 4 Hours.

Algebra-based physical science for students in pre-professional programs, biology, geology, or architecture who do not expect to do additional work in engineering or physics. Topics include elementary vector algebra, mechanics, heat, thermodynamics and sound.

RDG 343. Reading Beyond the Primary Grades. 3 Hours.

This course teaches content area teachers how to help their students learn from textbooks, including techniques for evaluating both textbooks and students. Coping with the reading, demands of textbooks, and study skills will be learned.

RDG 350. Emergent Literacy Development. 3 Hours.

This course provides the pre-service EC-6 teacher with knowledge and skills necessary to promote early literacy development. Students will develop competency in the components of emergent literacy, including oral language development, phonological and phonemic awareness, the alphabetic principle, high frequency vocabulary development, decoding and spelling strategies, and fluency development. The targeted grade levels for this course are early childhood through grade two.

SPED 410. Introduction to Individual with Exceptionalities. 3 Hours.

This course develops students’ foundational knowledge of historical perspectives, educational principles, laws, and professional ethics and roles in the fields of special education and English Language Learners (ELL). It focuses on the learning and behavioral characteristics of diverse learners, including students with exceptionalities (which includes disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders, Dyslexia, and Gifted/Talented) students who are ELL and students who are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional (CLDE) learners. Additionally, this course introduces instructional strategies, appropriate curriculum, accommodations, modifications, and assistive technology to ensure the success of all learners.

SPED 418. Research, Trends, and Issues in Education. 3 Hours.

This course presents current research, issues, and trends in education, specifically emphasizing the teaching-learning process. Students investigate neurodevelopment, action research in the classroom, academic response to intervention, and evidence-based decision-making. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program.

Faculty

Dr. Craig Nakashian

Associate Professor

Email: craig.nakashian@tamut.edu

Dr. Michael Perri

Associate Professor

Email: michael.perri@tamut.edu

Dr. Tom Wagy

Professor

Email: tom.wagy@tamut.edu

Laura Currey

Instructor

Email: laura.currey@tamut.edu

Dr. Teri Fowler

Assistant Professor

Email: teri.fowler@tamut.edu

Dr. Sandra Labby

Assistant Professor

Email: slabby@tamut.edu

Sara Langford

Instructor

Email: sara.langford@tamut.edu

Dr. Sara Lawrence

Assistant Professor

Email: sara.lawrence@tamut.edu

Dr. Judy Sander

Professor

Email: judy.sander@tamut.edu

Debora Shidemantle

Instructor

Email: debora.shidemantle@tamut.edu

Dr. Abbie Strunc

Assistant Professor

Email: astrunc@tamut.edu