Biology 7-12 Life Sciences Certification

Teacher Preparation Program Admission Requirements

Apply 3rd Year, 1st Semester

  1. Application to Teacher Prep Program via TK20 in September or February
  2. GPA requirement of 2.8 cumulative
  3. Completion of ED 311ED 321 and SPED 410 with grade C or above
  4. Completion of 15 hours in Content Area with no grade below C
  5. THEA IBT scores of Reading 240, Math 230, Writing 220

Biology w/ 7-12 Life Sciences Teacher Certification Degree Requirements

Students should refer to their DegreeWorks degree audit in their Web for Students account for more information regarding their degree requirements.

Major Requirements
General Education Requirements42
BIOL 1306Biology for Science Majors I 63
BIOL 1106Biology for Science Majors I Lab 71
BIOL 1307Biology for Science Majors II 63
BIOL 1107Biology for Science Majors II Lab 71
Approved LD Biology Electives8
CHEM 1311General Chemistry I3
CHEM 1111General Chemistry I (Lab)1
CHEM 1312General Chemistry II3
CHEM 1112General Chemistry II (Lab)1
BIOL 307General Ecology3
BIOL 308Invertebrate Zoology3
BIOL 310Genetics4
BIOL 402Cell and Molecular Biology4
BIOL 466Evolutionary Biology3
BIOL 481Seminar in Biology3
UD Biology Electives9
Other Requirements
ITED 350Technologies for Instruction, Learning, and Communication3
RDG 343Reading Beyond the Primary Grades3
MATH 2412Pre-Calculus 64
MATH 1342Elementary Statistical Methods3
Professional Development
ED 311Growth and Development for Early Childhood to Grade 123
ED 321Foundations of Education3
ED 435Secondary Content Pedagogy 83
SPED 410Introduction to Individual with Exceptionalities 83
Block 1
ED 331Classroom and Behavior Management 93
ED 495Block 1: Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates 93
Block 2
ED 496Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates 103
SPED 418Research, Trends, and Issues in Education 103
Minimum grade of "C" required in all Major, ED, SPED and Professional Development courses
Electives (as needed to satisfy minimum degree requirements including 54 semester credits of upper division)
Minimum Hours for Degree120
6

 Satisfies core curriculum

7

May satisfy core curriculum in Component Area Option

8

 Requires Admission to Teacher Prep Program

9

 Requires successful placement interview with a partnership public school district

10

  Requires passing all TExES exams

Note: A minimum of 54 upper division hours (300 and 400 level courses) are required for this degree. Resident credit totaling 25% of the hours is required for the degree.  A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in three areas for graduation:  Overall GPA, Institutional GPA, and Major GPA.

Undergraduate Courses in Biology w/7-12 Life Science

BIOL 1106. Biology for Science Majors I Lab. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with hands-on exploration in the biological sciences. Content includes the process of scientific inquiry, important concepts in biochemistry and genetics, and introduction to laboratory techniques. Corequisite: BIOL 1306.

BIOL 1107. Biology for Science Majors II Lab. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with hands-on exploration in the biological sciences. Content includes a survey of plants, animals, and microorganisms as well as studies of basic biological processes such as digestion, circulation, and nervous system function. Corequisite: BIOL 1307.

BIOL 1108. Biology for Non-science Majors I Lab. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with hands-on exploration in the biological sciences. Content includes the process of scientific inquiry, important concepts in biochemistry and genetics, and introduction to laboratory techniques. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 1308.

BIOL 1109. Biology for Non-science Majors II Lab. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with hands-on exploration in the biological sciences. Content includes the process of scientific inquiry, important concepts in biochemistry and genetics, and introduction to laboratory techniques. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 1309.

BIOL 1306. Biology for Science Majors I. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes the chemistry of life, the cell, genetics, and mechanisms of evolution. Corequisite: BIOL 1106.

BIOL 1307. Biology for Science Majors II. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306. Corequisite: BIOL 1107.

BIOL 1308. Biology for Non-Science Majors I. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes the chemistry of life, the cell, genetics, and mechanisms of evolution. NOTE: Lab may be required for specific majors.

BIOL 1309. Biology for Non-Science Majors II. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the nature of science and the application of science to contemporary issues. Content includes plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology. NOTE: Lab may be required for specific majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 1308.

BIOL 1414. Introduction to Biotechnology I. 4 Hours.

This course is an overview of classical genetics, DNA structure, the flow of genetic information, DNA replication, gene transcription, and protein translation. Principles of major molecular biology and genetic engineering techniques, including restriction enzymes and their uses, major types of cloning vectors, construction of libraries, Southern and Northern blotting, hybridization, PCR, and DNA typing will also be covered. Applications of these techniques will focus on human health and welfare, medicine, agriculture, and the environment. This course includes an introduction to the human genome project, gene therapy, molecular dianostics, forensics, creation and uses of transgenic plants and animals, and animal cloning, plus discussions of the ethical, legal, and social issues and scientific problems associated with these technologies. Relevant practical exercises in the above areas will be conducted.

BIOL 1415. Introduction to Biotechnology II. 4 Hours.

This lecture focuses on an integrative approach to study biomolecules with an empahsis on protein structures, functions, and uses in the modern bioscience laboratory. Students will investigate the mechanisms invloved in the transfer of informtion from DNA sequences to proteins to biochemical functions. The course will integrate biological and chemical concepts with techniques that are used in research and industry. Critical thinking will be applied in laboratory exercises using inquiry-based approaches, troubleshooting, and analyzing experimental data. Prerequisite: BIOL 1414.

BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 Hours.

This course covers basic human anatomy and physiological principles focusing on the cellular and tissue levels and their integration into the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. BIOL 1306 is recommended prior to BIOL 2401.

BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 Hours.

This course covers basic human anatomy and physiological principles focusing on the nervous, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, urinary, and reproductive organ systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 2401.

BIOL 2405. Introduction to Microbiology. 4 Hours.

This is an introductory microbiology course consisting of lecture and laboratory sessions and designed for the non-biology majors and allied health students. Topics include the morphology, physiology, and taxonomy of representative groups of pathogenic and nonpathogenic microorganisms; human-microbe interactions; public health microbiology; and host defense mechanisms. BIOL 1306 is recommended prior to BIOL 2405.

BIOL 2406. Environmental Biology. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of bioenvironmental science with emphasis on scientific literacy, current events, global and international issues, historic context, and the relationship between humans and the natural world. The course will also address conservation, pollution, energy, and other contemporary environmental problems.

BIOL 289. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

BIOL 307. General Ecology. 3 Hours.

This course covers the principles of ecology with special reference to populations and their ecosystems, distribution, biotic communities, and environmental relationships. This course requires field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306 and BIOL 1106, and BIOL 1307 and BIOL 1107.

BIOL 308. Invertebrate Zoology. 3 Hours.

This course explores the diversity of invertebrate types, morphologically, embryologically, and physiologically. The course emphasizes the ecological role of invertebrates. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306 and BIOL 1106, and BIOL 1307 and BIOL 1107.

BIOL 310. Genetics. 4 Hours.

Genetics is a four credit hour course for biology majors consisting of both lectures and laboratory activities. Topics include classical Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, linkage, variation, recombination, and biochemical and evolutionary aspects of gene function. Prerequisite: 8 SCH of Biology.

BIOL 311. General Microbiology. 4 Hours.

General Microbiology is an upper division undergraduate course on microbial biology consisting of both lectures and laboratory activities. In depth lectures cover eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbes and viruses, but emphasis is put on bacteria. This course provides a conceptual and experimental background in microbiology. This course is highly recommended for the pre-medical and pre-pharmacy students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of two semesters of Biology.

BIOL 335. Medical Terminology. 3 Hours.

This web-based course utilizes a systems approach to the language of medicine, including the analysis and utilizatino of word roots, combining forms, prefixes, suffixes, and medical terms; emphasis is on written and spoken medical vocabulary. Prerequisite: Completion of two semesters of Biology courses.

BIOL 402. Cell and Molecular Biology. 4 Hours.

This course consists of lectures and laboratory activities and will provide a strong background in the cellular and molecular aspects of biology. Topics include: methods in cellular and molecular biology, transcription in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, posttranscriptional events, translation, DNA replication, and recombination. Prerequisite: 8 SCH of Biology.

BIOL 415. Darwin and the Origin of Species. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on Darwin's hypotheses and compare his ideas with modern developments in the study of biological evolution.

BIOL 420. Global Change. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on global change. Major topics covered include climate change, sea level change/coastal inundation, ocean acidification, and permafrost and the changing Arctic. Prerequisite: 6 SCH of Biology.

BIOL 421. Endangered Ecosystems. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on endagered ecosystems and organisms from around the world. Coral reefs, Brazilian rainforest destruction, amphibian crisis, and the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone will be studied in detail. Prerequisite: 6 SCH in Biology.

BIOL 422. Atmosphere and Biosphere. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on how the atmosphere affects the biosphere. Stratospheric Ozone, Black Carbon (Soot), El Nino, and Carbon Monoxide: It's Environmental Impact will be studied in detail. Prerequisite: 6 SCH of Biology.

BIOL 430. Astrobiology. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the understanding that astrobiology is concerned with the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the Universe. It investigates life in its cosmic context. Cross listed with BIOL 530. Prerequisite: Two semesters of Biology or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 449. Vertebrate Histology. 4 Hours.

This course is the study of the cell and fundamental tissue types to include the microscopic structure of the organ systems of representative vertebrates. Emphasis will be on the relationship between microscopic structure and function. Prerequisite: Two semesters of biology, with Anatomy and Physiology recommended but not required.

BIOL 450. Limnology. 3 Hours.

This course is the study of the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of the freshwater environment. Prerequisite: Two semesters of biology.

BIOL 466. Evolutionary Biology. 3 Hours.

This course covers the basic principles, mechanisms, and patterns of evolutionary biology including a historical survey of related ideas. Prerequisite: Two semesters of biology.

BIOL 472. Introduction to Forensic Science. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of basic concepts, techniques, practices, and procedures of criminalistics, including the most current technologies in forensic analysis. Criminal investigation of actual cases will be discussed with a minimum of scientific terminology. In addition, the course will emphasize the nature of physical evidence, including the use of DNA profiling. This course is strongly recommended for Criminal Justice majors and Pre-Allied Health track students in Biology. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

BIOL 481. Seminar in Biology. 3 Hours.

This course requires student participation in general and specific topics in biology. May be repeated in a different topic. Prerequisite: Senior standing with Biology major.

BIOL 489. Independent Study in Biology. 1-4 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

BIOL 490. Introduction to Biotechnology. 4 Hours.

This course will explore the principles and applications of DNA science with special reference to recombinant DNA technology. This course is highly recommended for students focusing on a career in the medical field. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

BIOL 497. Special Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Instructors will provide an organized class designed to cover areas of specific interest. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

BIOL 499. Independent Research. 1-6 Hours.

Independent research in Biology conducted by a student under the guidance of a faculty member of his or her choice. The student is required to maintain a research journal and submit a project report by the end of the semester and potentially make an oral presentation on the project. SCH and hours are by arrangement and, with a change in content, this course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ED 311. Growth and Development for Early Childhood to Grade 12. 3 Hours.

This course examines theories of children's growth and development along with relationships to learning and teaching. Cultural, emotional, physical, intellectual, and learning differences are studied. Prerequisite: None.

ED 321. Foundations of Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines theories of learning along with the impact of strategies for effective teaching. Educational measurement and evaluation as used by schools will be studied. Theories relevant to the use of media and technology will be addressed. Prerequisite: None.

ED 331. Classroom and Behavior Management. 3 Hours.

This course presents best practices in classroom and behavior management including management of time, materials, and space. Additionally, the course examines strategies for managing individual and large-group student behaviors, transitions, lab activities, and other arrangements for classrooms in general and special education. Prerequisite: Admitted to the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 435. Secondary Content Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

This course provides students seeking certification in grades 4-8 and 7-12 with pedagogical best-practices. Students will learn lesson planning, assessment, and available resources for their specific content area. Methods for accessing and processing information through traditional as well as new technologies will be addressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 495. Block 1: Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates. 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical work in the public school setting as part of field experience requirements for the undergraduate Teacher Preparation Program (TPP). University student is identified as Teacher Candidate and is required to spend 6 hours per week for 12 weeks in an assigned classroom under the supervision of an Instructional Leadership Team (ILT) to include University Field Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher. Block 1 is the first semester of the co-teaching assignment (2 semesters) in which Teacher Candidate and Cooperating Teacher are considered co-teachers for the class. Student is required to complete assignments, activities, projects, and observations as assigned by ILT. Prerequisite: Approved field-based assignment by the Teacher Preparation Program.

ED 496. Co-Teaching Practicum for Certification Candidates. 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical work in the public school setting as part of field experience requirements for the undergraduate Teacher Preparation Program (TPP). University student is identified as Teacher Candidate and is required to spend 72 full public school days in an assigned classroom under the supervision of an Instructional Leadership Team (ILT) to include University Field Supervisor and Cooperating Teacher. Block 1 (prerequisite) is the first semester of the co-teaching assignment (2 semesters) in which Teacher Candidate and their Cooperating Teacher are considered co-teachers for the class in a public school setting in the grade level and content of the certification they are seeking. Student will complete assignments, activities, projects, and observations related to certification being sought as assigned by ILT. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ED 495; passing scores on both TExES PPR and TExES Content exams appropriate for the level and certification being sought; continued acceptance in a public school classroom.

ITED 350. Technologies for Instruction, Learning, and Communication. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop a comfort with technology and its application to communication. Emphasis is placed on computer assisted presentations, software/hardware analysis, and the design and execution of instruction using electronic means. Previously offered as COMM 350.

MATH 2412. Pre-Calculus. 4 Hours.

Placement will also be determined by the Math Placement Exam score. This course provides a rigorous study of the concepts and applications of the fundamental topics of calculus including algebraic functions and their graphs, trigonometric functions and identities, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, solutions to equations and inequalities, analytic geometry, and polar coordinates. This course is designed to prepare STEM majors for success in calculus. Appropriate computer software and hand held technologies will be utilized. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 with a C or better or the equivalent preparation by STEM department chair permission.

RDG 343. Reading Beyond the Primary Grades. 3 Hours.

This course teaches content area teachers how to help their students learn from textbooks, including techniques for evaluating both textbooks and students. Coping with the reading, demands of textbooks, and study skills will be learned.

SPED 410. Introduction to Individual with Exceptionalities. 3 Hours.

This course develops students’ foundational knowledge of historical perspectives, educational principles, laws, and professional ethics and roles in the fields of special education and English Language Learners (ELL). It focuses on the learning and behavioral characteristics of diverse learners, including students with exceptionalities (which includes disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders, Dyslexia, and Gifted/Talented) students who are ELL and students who are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional (CLDE) learners. Additionally, this course introduces instructional strategies, appropriate curriculum, accommodations, modifications, and assistive technology to ensure the success of all learners.

SPED 418. Research, Trends, and Issues in Education. 3 Hours.

This course presents current research, issues, and trends in education, specifically emphasizing the teaching-learning process. Students investigate neurodevelopment, action research in the classroom, academic response to intervention, and evidence-based decision-making. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program.

Faculty

Dr. Nurul Alam

Associate Professor

Email: nurul.alam@tamut.edu

Dr. David Allard

Professor

Email: david.allard@tamut.edu

Dr. Benjamin Neuman

Associate Professor

Email: bneuman@tamut.edu

Laura Currey

Instructor

Email: laura.currey@tamut.edu

Dr. Teri Fowler

Assistant Professor

Email: teri.fowler@tamut.edu

Dr. Sandra Labby

Assistant Professor

Email: slabby@tamut.edu

Sara Langford

Instructor

Email: sara.langford@tamut.edu

Dr. Sara Lawrence

Assistant Professor

Email: sara.lawrence@tamut.edu

Dr. Judy Sander

Professor

Email: judy.sander@tamut.edu

Debora Shidemantle

Instructor

Email: debora.shidemantle@tamut.edu

Dr. Abbie Strunc

Assistant Professor

Email: astrunc@tamut.edu