English

Undergraduates in English pursue majors and minors in Literature; at the graduate level, majors earn a Master of Arts in Literature or in Composition and may pursue a Master Teacher of Writing certificate.  At both levels, the English program at Texas A&M University-Texarkana affords students the ability to work closely with a small, diverse faculty of dedicated and accomplished teachers and scholars in a curriculum emphasizing literature, writing, and literary studies.

The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in English provide students with a strong background in English and American literature. Students must take World Literature, British Literature, American Literature and Literary Studies at the sophomore level. The core of the B.A. and B.S. programs in English consists of required survey courses, Advanced American Literature ENG 442, English Literature ENG 472, World Literature ENG 445, Understanding Grammar ENG 320, Advanced Expository Writing ENG 340, and Studies in Genre ENG 450. Other required courses for English majors are History and Grammar of English ENG 424, which provides students with an understanding of the origin and development of the English language and a survey of grammatical approaches to the language, and Shakespeare ENG 312, which offers a detailed look at some of the major works of this important author. Optional courses, such as ENG 430: Studies in Women's Literature, ENG 305 and ENG 306: Children’s Literature and Young Adult Literature, and ENG 497: Special Topics allow students to customize their degree plans. English majors also participate in a capstone course, ENG 491, during the semester they graduate.

Within the program, our students certainly develop a pleasure and skill in reading with comprehension and insight. English majors also develop the skill to write effectively and even beautifully.  However, while central to the program, these are not the only advantages for our students.  The program in English grounds students in language skills and analytic practices allowing our majors to develop tools that not only retain their value, unlike in technical fields, but also transfer easily to specialized work in graduate and professional schools as well as in the workplace.  Ultimately, a degree in English is a wonderful portal to careers and advanced degrees in and out of English. 

Career Options

Education: College level, Primary Education, Secondary Education, Private Schools, Teaching English as a Second Language, Tutoring, Educational Administration, Editorial Assistant, Copyediting/Proofreading, Internships, Production, Marketing/Publicity, Publishing, Journalism, Corporate Communications, Public Relations, Digital Media, Creative Writing, Copywriting, Technical Writing, Science Writing, Freelance Writing, and Grant Writing.

Degree Requirements

Students should refer to their DegreeWorks degree audit in their Web for Students account for more information regarding their degree requirements.

Major Requirements 6
General Education Requirements42
ENGL 1301Composition I 83
ENGL 1302Composition II 83
ENGL 2321British Literature 83
ENGL 2326American Literature 83
ENGL 2331World Literature 83
ENGL 2360Introduction to Literary Studies3
ENG 312Shakespeare3
ENG 320Understanding Grammar3
ENG 340Advanced Expository Writing3
ENG 424History and Grammar of the English Language3
ENG 442Advanced American Literature3
ENG 450Studies in Genre3
ENG 445Advanced World Literature3
ENG 472Advanced British Literature3
ENG 491Capstone in English Studies1
Select six semester credit hours from the following:6
Children's Literature I
Young Adult Literature
Studies in Women's Literature
Individual Study
Special Topics
Minor18
Minimum of 18 semester credit hours from minors listed in the catalog (9 of which must be Upper Division semester credit hours)
Other Requirements
Upper Division Electives from History, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology6
Electives (as needed to satisfy minimum degree requirements including 54 semester credit hours of Upper Division Coursework) 7
Minimum Hours for Degree120
6

 Minimum Grade of 'C' required in all Major Courses

7

 9 semester credit hours of which must be UD Electives from English or Drama

8

 Satisfies Core Curriculum

Note: A minimum of 54 upper division hours (300 and 400 level courses) are required for this degree. Resident credit totaling 25% of the hours is required for the degree.  A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in three areas for graduation:  Overall GPA, Institutional GPA, and Major GPA.

English Minor

ENGL 1301Composition I 13
ENGL 1302Composition II 13
1 Course in:3
British Literature
American Literature
World Literature
Select two of the following:6
Advanced American Literature
Advanced British Literature
Advanced World Literature
1 Course in:3
Studies in Genre
Total Hours18
1

 1  also satisfies general education core curriculum

Undergraduate Courses in English

ENG 305. Children's Literature I. 3 Hours.

This course provides a survey of the history of children's books, books for very young children, picture books and illustrators, short fiction, folk tales, fables, myths and epics, historical fiction and biography.

ENG 306. Young Adult Literature. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of young adult literature.

ENG 312. Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of the author's plays with special attention devoted to major and better-known works.

ENG 320. Understanding Grammar. 3 Hours.

This course engenders improved application and understanding of English grammar by using traditional sentence diagramming to review fundamental principles of grammar and mechanics.

ENG 340. Advanced Expository Writing. 3 Hours.

Through guided practice, students develop the ability to write prose that informs and persuades. While they draft, revise, and edit a series of essays, students apply strategies for writing with effective organization and style. The course also demands careful reading and discussion of model essays and articles drawn from a diverse selection of published authors. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 with a grade of C or better.

ENG 345. Advanced Composition for Educators. 3 Hours.

This course provides future educators opportunities to grow as writers, personally and professionally, through interaction with the conventions of writing, literature, and writing across the curriculum, all within a writing community focused on education of self and others. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 with a grade of C or better.

ENG 350. Technical Writing. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes the principles of composition, document design, and rhetoric applied to primary genres within scientific, technical, and professional writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 with a grade of C or better.

ENG 424. History and Grammar of the English Language. 3 Hours.

Participants will cover topics that include the basic features of human language, a historical study of English, and a study of English phonology, morphology, and syntax.

ENG 430. Studies in Women's Literature. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of the various images of women in literature with an emphasis on the twentieth century.

ENG 442. Advanced American Literature. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of specific eras of American Literature. Topics will vary.

ENG 445. Advanced World Literature. 3 Hours.

This advanced course in World Literature aims to introduce students to a selection of classic and/or modern literary works outside of the United States and Britain. One of the goals of the course is to analyze and discuss these works of literature within their soci-historical context with an emphasis upon a different theme or literary movement presented in each offering of the course. While this varying theme or movement will demarcate the frame of the course, the theme of encounters (textual and cultural) remains consistent and the importance of factors such as race, class, gender, religion, language, translation, and so on will be taken into consideration. The students' critical engagement with the assigned works of literature will be further enhanced by the historical and literary background provided by lectures and secondary sources. No prior knowledge of or familiarity with other languages is required as all reading materials are provided in English translation.

ENG 450. Studies in Genre. 3 Hours.

This course provides an advanced study of one of the following literary genres: Short Story, Film, Poetry, Drama, and International Literature. It may be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 472. Advanced British Literature. 3 Hours.

This course provides a study of specific eras of British Literature. Topics will vary.

ENG 489. Individual Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENG 491. Capstone in English Studies. 1 Hour.

This course constitutes a practicum in which students review English studies with emphasis on critical approaches to literature, literary terminology, and the characteristics and major writers of literary periods. Students write capstone papers that reflect their understanding of the components of literary study. Prerequisite: To be taken during the final semester of the bachelor's degree program in English.

ENG 497. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Instructors will provide an organized class designed to cover areas of specific interest. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENGL 089. Independent Study in Developmental Writing. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENGL 1101. Information Literacy. 1 Hour.

This course covers the basic concepts and skills of information literacy, the research process, critical thinking skills, and ethical aspects of information. Students are introduced to characteristics, formats, and organization of information, and are provided with practical experience in the use of the academic library. Course content also introduces electronic resources such as journal databases, search engines, and directories.

ENGL 1111. Popular Music as Literature. 1 Hour.

Popular Music as Literature offers students an introduction to literary study through the vehicle of popular music. Literary terminology and forms are considered within the context of pop music. It requires students to read closely and critically and become sensitive to the nuances of language.

ENGL 1301. Composition I. 3 Hours.

This course helps students understand and develop their writing, reading, and thinking skills through the creation and rhetorical study of personal and scholarly texts. It includes a focus on the principles and techniques of written expository and persuasive texts and critical thinking.

ENGL 1302. Composition II. 3 Hours.

This course builds on those skills developed in Composition I and assumes a satisfactory level of student competency in composition. Additionally, as in Composition I, this course helps students understand and develop their writing, reading, and thinking skills through the creation and rhetorical study of personal and scholarly texts. It requires more extensive and analytical reading and writing than Composition I. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 with a C or better.

ENGL 189. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ENGL 2321. British Literature. 3 Hours.

This course serves as an introductory survey of the major authors in English literature from the Old English period to the present. It includes a variety of genres and considers the works as intellectual, cultural, aesthetic creations. It requires students to apply interpretive skills in writing about pieces of literature and to be aware of the traditional literary periods. English majors and non-English majors may take this course, which satisfies the core-curriculum requirement for three lower-division semester credit hours in Creative Arts.

ENGL 2326. American Literature. 3 Hours.

This course examines representative works of American Literature from pre-colonial times to the contemporary period using historical, philosophical, and structural filters to investigate universal social themes. There are no prerequisites for this course. English majors and non-English majors may take this course, which satisfies the core-curriculum requirement for three lower-division semester credit hours in Creative Arts.

ENGL 2331. World Literature. 3 Hours.

World Literature is a survey of some of the major works of literature across the world from early civilizations to present, focusing on major periods. Students who take this course will increase their awareness of historical cultures; sharpen their critical reading, thinking, and writing skills; and deepen their cultural sensitivity. English majors and non-English majors may take this course, which satisfies the core-curriculum requirement for three lower-division semester credit hours in Creative Arts.

ENGL 2340. Writing Across the Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This course helps students understand and develop their writing, reading, and thinking skills across the disciplines through the creation and rhetorical study of personal and scholarly texts. It includes a focus on the principles and techniques of written expository and persuasive texts and critical thinking across the curriculum.

ENGL 2351. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

This course promotes the development of creative writing skills by introducing and applying core concepts for writing creative non-fiction, poems, scripts, and short stories.

ENGL 2360. Introduction to Literary Studies. 3 Hours.

This course is an examination of the fundamental principles of literary study with special attention to critical approaches to language and literature, bibliography and research, and writing in the discipline. As an introduction to literary study designed for English majors, this course stresses proper literary terminology, literary theory, and analytical writing; the tools of a successful English major.

ENGL 289. Independent Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

Faculty

Dr. Brian C. Billings

Associate Professor

Email: bbillings@tamut.edu

Dr. Joseph Burzynski

Assistant Professor

Email: jburzynski@tamut.edu

Dr. Doris Davis

Professor

Email: doris.davis@tamut.edu

Dr. Dayna (Joy) Goldstein

Assistant Professor

Email: dgoldstein@tamut.edu

Dr. Corrine Hinton

Assistant Professor

Email: corrine.hinton@tamut.edu

Dr. Douglas Julien

Associate Professor

Email: doug.julien@tamut.edu