General Business Concentration

In Business Administration, students will build a broad foundation with a multitude of business topics.  This curriculum is designed to build foundational skills in such areas as business strategic planning, budgeting, forecasting, inventory management, foundations of accounting, logistics, and marketing.  The students graduate with the skills to improve operating efficiencies in a wide range of businesses.  Students are prepared to think critically, communicate well,  and contribute immediately to a company’s bottom line.  Business Administration graduates from Texas A&M University-Texarkana are hired into a wide range of businesses including service companies, financial institutions, or industrial companies.  Some graduates, alternatively, choose to pursue their own businesses.  Business Administration students from A&M-Texarkana offer companies that entrepreneurial mindset that many companies value.

General Business Concentration  Requirements

Students should refer to their DegreeWorks degree audit in their Web for Students account for more information regarding their degree requirements.

Major Requirements
General Education Requirements42
Business Administration Core Courses
ACCT 325Managerial Accounting3
FIN 354Financial Management3
GBUS 325Business Law3
GBUS 450Business Ethics3
MGT 395Principles of Management3
MGT 439Business Strategy and Policy3
MGT 465Production and Operations Management3
MIS 360Essentials of Management Information Systems3
MKT 363Marketing3
SCM 325Business Statistics3
General Business Concentration Requirements18
18 semester credit hours Upper Division Business Electives
Other Requirements-Business Introductory Courses
ACCT 2301Principles of Accounting I3
ACCT 2302Principles of Accounting II3
BCIS 1305Business Computer Applications3
ECON 2301Principles of Macroeconomics 63
ECON 2302Principles of Microeconomics 63
MATH 1342Elementary Statistical Methods3
BBA Secondary Core
FIN 325Money, Banking, and Financial Markets3
GBUS 440International Business3
MGT 321Organizational Behaviors3
MGT 366Topics in Organizational Leadership3
or MGT 446 Entrepreneurship
Minimum Hours for Degree120
6

 Satisfies Core Curriculum

Note: A minimum of 54 upper division hours (300 and 400 level courses) are required for this degree. Resident credit totaling 25% of the hours is required for the degree.  A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in three areas for graduation:  Overall GPA, Institutional GPA, and Major GPA.

Undergraduate Courses in Business Administration

ACCT 2301. Principles of Accounting I. 3 Hours.

This is an introduction to financial accounting concepts and financial statement reporting. The focus revolves around the creation, reporting, interpretation, and analysis of accounting information. Topics include the accounting cycle and underlying concepts, techniques for preparing and analyzing financial statements, and issues in accounting for assets, liabilities, and capital budgeting.

ACCT 2302. Principles of Accounting II. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of how accounting data is used by management in planning, control, and decision making to aid in achieving predetermined organizational objectives. Topics include budgetary planning, costing techniques, standard costs, compensation, and capital budgeting. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301.

ACCT 289. Independent Study in Accounting. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

ACCT 321. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 Hours.

This is the study of the theoretical basis for financial accounting concepts and principles related to financial reporting. Specific topics include present value concepts, cash, and receivables. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 with grades of C or better.

ACCT 322. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 Hours.

This course is a continuation of ACCT 321 which includes such topics as inventory, fixed assets, depreciation, intangibles, liabilities, and investments. Prerequisite: ACCT 321 with a grade of C or better.

ACCT 323. Intermediate Accounting III. 3 Hours.

This course is a continuation of ACCT 322 and includes such topics as revenue recognition, deferred taxes, pensions, leases, error analysis, cash flows and full disclosure. Prerequisite: ACCT 322 with a grade of D or better.

ACCT 324. Income Tax Accounting. 3 Hours.

This course addresses current federal income tax laws with attention given to economic, social, and historic viewpoints. Major emphasis is placed on the technical and accounting aspects, including the preparation of income tax returns. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 with a grade of C or better.

ACCT 325. Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

This course explores the application in business operations of accounting information for management decision making. The course integrates topics in cost determination, data processing, economic analysis, budgeting, and management and financial control. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 with grades of C or better.

ACCT 421. Governmental Accounting. 3 Hours.

This class is a discussion of nonprofit accounting to include the fund entity concept used primarily for accounting and financial reporting for municipalities, hospitals, colleges and other nonprofit organizations. In addition, partnership accounting will be covered to include income distributed, dissolution and liquidation. Prerequisite: ACCT 321 with a grade of C or better.

ACCT 422. Advanced Accounting. 3 Hours.

Advanced Accounting covers the basics of preparing a consolidated income statement and balance sheet. Prerequisite: ACCT 322 and ACCT 323 with a grade of C or better.

ACCT 424. Corporate Income Tax. 3 Hours.

The course gives students a basic understanding of the U.S. Tax Code as it pertains to Subchapter C corporations, Subchapter S corporations, and the taxation of partnerships. It also gives the student a basic understanding of how to do income tax research. Prerequisite: ACCT 324 with a grade of C or better.

ACCT 425. Cost Accounting. 3 Hours.

Course covers job order and process cost systems using actual or standard costs. Additional topics include overhead analysis, joint and by-product costing and variance analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301, ACCT 2302, and ACCT 325 with grades of C or better.

ACCT 427. Auditing. 3 Hours.

This course examines the basic principles and practices used by public accountants and internal auditors in examining financial statements and supporting data. Prerequisite: ACCT 322 and ACCT 429 with grades of C or better.

ACCT 429. Accounting Systems. 3 Hours.

This course covers the investigation, construction and installation of accounting systems. Students will receive hands-on experience with a computerized accounting system. Prerequisite: ACCT 322 with a grade of C or better.

ACCT 438. Profitability in Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

The goal of this course is to give supply chain managers the tools that will assist them in assessing the effect of their decisions on the profitability of their firms. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302.

ACCT 489. Individual Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

BCIS 1305. Business Computer Applications. 3 Hours.

This course affords students hands-on experience utilizing Microsoft Office to address business concerns. Specifically, Word, Excel, Access, and Power Point applications are addressed through instruction, lab assignments, and presentations. This course should be taken during the first year of enrollment.

BUSI 1301. Introduction to Business. 3 Hours.

Open to non-business majors, this course introduces areas of accounting, computer information systems, economics, finance, marketing, management, and production. It furnishes an overview of subjects covered in more depth in more specialized business and economic courses.

BUSI 2101. Introduction to Leadership Principles. 1 Hour.

Leading organizations in a contemporary business climate is increasingly complex. The evolution of the global market place and the economic challenges associated with instant access to electronic information and how that has altered traditional leadership thinking will be explored. This course focuses on the complexity of twenty-first century organizations and the application of leadership in this environment. (1 sch).

BUSI 2102. Building Trust: The Heart of Leadership. 1 Hour.

High trust organizations thrive in all economic environments but thrive exceptionally well in tough economic times as a result of increased efficiency and speed. Highly successful organizations characteristically have leaders who are able to build a "high trust" environment and continually work to develop and maintain that "high trust" work place. This course will explore the characteristics of leaders that are capable of building these "high trust" organizations. (1 sch).

BUSI 2103. Communication: Written & Oral. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with the skills necessary for public speaking and business writing in a professional environment.

BUSI 2104. Clarifying Purpose: Defining the Core Mission. 1 Hour.

Surveys of companies and organizations throughout the United States show an alarming trend indicating only a limited number of their employees are able to clearly define the Core Mission of the business. Without this clarity of purpose employees often fail to embrace the very reason for their employment. For an employee's work to be meaningful, and to recruit and retain the best and the brightest, organizations/companies must find new ways to cascade an understanding of the core mission throughout the organization. (1 SCH).

BUSI 2105. Aligning Systems: Moving from Planning to Execution. 1 Hour.

The leader's skill to link the three core processes of people, strategy, and operations into an aligned model or system that will ensure timely execution may be one of the best predictors of success for companies and organizations in the 21st century. Lagging indicators like capital resources and inventory are no longer primary predictors of future success when "just in time delivery" of the product most immediately desired by the customer is so rapidly becoming the norming benchmark for profitability. Those leaders, who have mastered the ability to create and architecture of execution, and then lead and improve that execution model every day, have proven to be some of the most elusive talent in today's fast paced society. Topics include: what is a "system"; aligning to meet the highest priority; matching goals to outcomes; communicating what is "wildly" important; enabling people to give their best; acting on "lead measures"; core work processes; creating a culture and rhythm of accountability; creating and implementing a compelling scoreboard; and utilizing failure to improve.

BUSI 2106. Time Management/Effective Decision Making. 1 Hour.

This course presents the concepts of time management as they relate to effective decisioin making.

BUSI 2107. Written Communication for Leaders. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with the skills necessary for business writing in a professional environment.

BUSI 2108. Verbal Communication for Leaders. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with the skills necessary for public speaking in a professional environment.

BUSI 2109. Strengths Based Leadership. 1 Hour.

The ground breaking research of Donald Clifton on the leadership and management of employees via a "strengths based" model will serve as a foundation to explore how to lead people through their strengths. Topics include: a historical perspective of the most widely accepted model of the management; the research base for Clifton's "strengths based leadership" and an overview of a "strengths based thinking" model.

ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Hours.

This course examines the economic behavior of the aggregate U.S. economy. Major topics include fundamental macroeconomic principles, national employment, prices, economic growth, business cycles, and monetary and fiscal stabilization.

ECON 2302. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the concepts and tools of microeconomic analysis. Major topics include fundamental microeconomic principles, price theory including supply and demand and marginal analysis, factors of production, costs of production, the demand for resources, industry structure, and the role of government.

FIN 325. Money, Banking, and Financial Markets. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of the American banking system, in particular the Federal Reserve System and the tools it uses to control the economy. It is also a study of the theories of fiscal and monetary policy. Prerequisite: ECON 2301 and ECON 2302.

FIN 354. Financial Management. 3 Hours.

The organization, the instruments, and the methods of financing corporations with reference primarily to the effects on the corporation and its stockholders will be covered. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302.

FIN 464. Principles of Investments. 3 Hours.

This is an introduction to the basic principles of investing, which includes the study of the behavior of securities markets mechanics of stock analysis and investing, decision making techniques, and risk. Prerequisite: FIN 325 and FIN 354.

FIN 470. International Finance. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of the institutions and relationships of the international financial system as it relates to the balance of payments, foreign exchange risk, arbitrage, political risk, foreign investment and operations, global banking, and international finance resources. Prerequisite: FIN 325 and FIN 354.

FIN 474. Intermediate Financial Management. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced analysis of the sources and uses of funds by corporations. Emphasis is on security valuation techniques, long-term investment decisions, capital structure decisions, and dividend policy. Prerequisite: FIN 325 and FIN 354.

FIN 484. Financial Institutions Management. 3 Hours.

This course examines the practices and instruments of institutions comprising finance, industry, portfolio investment policies, legal controls, growth developments, and management practices of financial institutions (particularly banks). Prerequisite: FIN 325 and FIN 354.

FIN 489. Individual Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

FIN 494. Security Analysis and Portfolio Management. 3 Hours.

This course is an advanced evaluation of investment securities of both private and public institutions through external analysis of financial statements and economic conditions, risk and return analysis, and portfolio selection. Prerequisite: FIN 464.

FIN 496. Financial Derivatives. 3 Hours.

This course will cover a variety of basic finance topics and will apply these topics to health care institutions, primarily hospitals. The course is primarily designed for health care supervision/management personnel with no formal training in finance. Due to the uniqueness of hospitals in regard to payment systems (DRGs), financial statement presentations, etc., students who have already completed a basic finance course would find this course useful.

GBUS 300. Economic Development and the Global Economy. 1 Hour.

This course will provide an introduction and basic understanding of the global economy and its impact on the world of economic development. The theoretical aspects include economics, capitalism, innovation, strategies and value issues. The practical aspects include market analysis, writing business plans, selecting the most beneficial entity, team development, capitalization, team member selection and legal and ethical issues.

GBUS 301. Strategic Planning and Development. 1 Hour.

This course presents the concepts of strategic planning considering its nature, scope, elements, development and the steps in the strategic planning process. (1 sch).

GBUS 302. Implementing the Leadership Action Plan. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to assist each individual student to identify their unique strengths as a leader or potential leader. To facilitate the development of a personalized student growth plan the Gallup Strengths Finder 2.0 has been chosen for administration to each student. Following the initial class meeting; students will read the text Strengths Based Leadership and execute the online Strengths Finder 2.0 evaluation.

GBUS 325. Business Law. 3 Hours.

This course covers the study of the legal principles of business with emphasis on legal reasoning, dispute resolution and procedure, contract law, bankruptcy law, and Uniform Commercial Code sections concerning contracts, security interests, negotiable instruments, and sales. Prerequisite: Junior classification.

GBUS 430. The Culture of Mexico. 3 Hours.

Via a trip to Mexico City, this course provides an interdisciplinary business background for understanding the growing commercial and economic interdependence among nations and specifically as related to the major trading partner of the United States ¿ the country of Mexico. Course content focuses on 1) the impact of culture on the Mexican citizens; 2) differences in U.S. and Mexican cultures; 3) how Mexican culture affects its attitude towards its neighbors; and 4) the structure of the Mexican population by ethnic groups and how this affects the culture. Prerequisite: Course requires travel outside of the United States.

GBUS 435. The Economy of Mexico. 3 Hours.

Via a trip to Mexico City, this course provides an interdisciplinary business background for understanding the growing commercial and economic interdependence among nations and specifically as related to the major trading partner of the United States ¿ the country of Mexico. Course content focuses on 1) the economic structure of the Mexican economy; 2) the role of exports; 3) major international trading partners; 4) growth of the economy by sectors; 5) why illegal aliens cross the U.S. borders and the impact on the economy and psyche of the people, including the government. Prerequisite: Course requires travel outside of the United States.

GBUS 440. International Business. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to allow students to explore problems and challenges in international business. Students are given the opportunity to visit with representatives of various international companies during a field trip.

GBUS 450. Business Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of ethical problems in business and the foundation for decisions involving ethical issues. Topics include ethical concepts, personal integrity, individual conscience and company loyalty and responsibility conflicts, as they impact on the decision process in the functional areas of business.

GBUS 456. Social, Political and Legal Environment. 3 Hours.

The study of the social, political, and legal environments in which organizations must operate, this course places special emphasis on legal institutions, their impact upon the operation and performance of business and government, and ethical standards and their effect upon business and government.

GBUS 470. Internship in Business. 3 Hours.

This is a directed internship that provides business students with the applications of business related knowledge in an organization. The student receives hands-on experience under the joint guidance of a professional from an organization and a faculty supervisor. May repeat for additional 3 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GBUS 489. Individual Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

GBUS 497. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Instructors will provide an organized class designed to cover areas of specific interest. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

MGT 2330. Industrial Project Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the Critical Path Method and Program Evaluation and Review Technique. The course covers project planning and control methods; activity sequencing; time-cost trade-offs; allocation of manpower and equipment resources; scheduling activities; and computer analysis for PERT/CPM with emphasis on MS Project. Development of work breakdown structures, analysis of case studies, development resource relationship worksheets and the study of real-life project issues will be utilized as homework and as hands-on exercises.

MGT 300. Personnel Management Evaluation and Development. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to provide a foundation in the psychology of strength development, as well as, an undersxtanding of how "quality" products and/or services are directly linked to the management of personnel through a lead-management model. Students will be introduced to actual conversational techniques and strategies that will empower the worker and the supervisor. Students will be directly involved in hands on practice of these techniques.

MGT 301. Personnel Management: Cultural Change and Innovation. 1 Hour.

This course focuses on providing an understanding of the skills necessary to achieve organizational change through innovation and cultural diversity. Topics include workplace diversity and diversity management, organizational culture, the nine GLOBE cultural dimensions, generational differences in organizations, and other related topics determined appropriate for employees and employers.

MGT 320. Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

This class discusses management of the supply and purchasing functions. This course explores how to determine price, quality assurance, selction of suppliers, negotiation, supplier consulation and training, and the legal and environmental ascpest of purchasing and supply.

MGT 321. Organizational Behaviors. 3 Hours.

This class examines the study of human behavior in complex organizations with emphasis on individual, small group, and inter-group behavior and how it affects and is affected by the organization in pursuit of organizational goals.

MGT 325. Business Statistics. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to statistical methods used in addressing real world business problems. Topics covered include sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, simple regression, and multiple regression. Appropriate computer resources will be used. Prerequisite: MATH 1342 and BCIS 1305.

MGT 326. Labor Relations. 3 Hours.

This course discusses labor in the United States with emphasis on the historical development of unionism labor legislation, union structure, bargaining issues, contract negotiations and administration, and labor-management relations.

MGT 330. Logistics Management. 3 Hours.

This course explores concepts and systems designed to facilitate and control the movement of materials and parts through the procurement, production and distribution processes until they reach the final user. Topics include transportation, inventory control, materials handling, warehousing, customer service, order processing, planning and control.

MGT 366. Topics in Organizational Leadership. 3 Hours.

Leading organizations in a contemporary business climate is increasingly complex. This course focuses on the complexity of today's organization and the application of leadership in this environment. An important component of this class is the guest lecturers delivered by local organizational leaders. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and MGT 395.

MGT 395. Principles of Management. 3 Hours.

This class is a study of management principles that apply to all types of business organizations with special emphasis on planning, organizing, staffing, and controlling.

MGT 438. Compensation Management. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of the total compensation management systems. Financial considerations are emphasized including the environment of the employer organization, organizational policies, job analysis, job evaluation and employee performance and appraisal. Non-financial compensation components are studied from the viewpoint of the work environment and job design. Prerequisite: MGT 395.

MGT 439. Business Strategy and Policy. 3 Hours.

In this capstone course students apply and integrate prior knowledge, i.e., accounting, finance, management, marketing, and economics. It also focuses upon the strategic process: the systematic analysis of changing conditions and the adapting of goals, strategies, and policies to meet organizational opportunities and threats. Prerequisite: ACCT 325, FIN 354, MGT 395, MKT 363, and senior standing business major.

MGT 444. Field Experience in Business. 3 Hours.

Working with a business on a consulting basis, students identify and analyze problem area(s) while gaining experience in business problem solving and project management. Students are expected to define the project and utilize appropriate methodology. At the conclusion a formally written report is prepared and an oral presentation is made to the business owner. Prerequisite: MGT 395 and Senior standing.

MGT 446. Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

This class is an examination of the characteristics of a successful entrepreneur as a person who has the need to build and create something new. Emphasis is on the application of entrepreneurship to small businesses, new ventures, established businesses and franchises. Prerequisite: MGT 395.

MGT 465. Production and Operations Management. 3 Hours.

This class is an introduction to the problems and practices involved in the manufacturing and service industry. Topics include production and operations strategies, facilities location and layout, production planning and scheduling, inventory management and quality control. Prerequisite: MGT 395.

MGT 475. Management Science. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of modern quantitative techniques in business decision-making. The application of both deterministic and probabilistic models is included. Prerequisite: MATH 1342.

MGT 489. Individual Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

MGT 495. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This course explores the principles, policies, and practices currently related to the organization and administration of a human resource management department; employment, promotion, and retirement; comparative analysis of such human resource practices as performance evaluation instruments, job evaluation, safety and welfare programs. Prerequisite: MGT 395.

MGT 498. Human Resource Selection. 3 Hours.

Selection is the process of collecting and evaluating information about an individual in order to extend an offer of employment. Such employment could be either a first position for a new employee or a different position for a current employee. The selection process is performed under legal and environmental constraints and addresses the future interests of the organization and of the individual. Prerequisite: MGT 495.

MIS 302. Enterprise Resource Planning. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of enterprise systems and supply chain business processes, and introduces students to how enterprise systems are used to manage supply chains and make effective business decisions.

MIS 305. Electronic Commerce. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of the practices and methods used in implementing electronic commerce business solutions. Topics will include logistics and support activities, electronic data interchange, electronic supply chain management, and implementation issues. The auction process and web auction strategies will be discussed. Prerequisite: MIS 360.

MIS 308. Project Management. 3 Hours.

This class is a study of the practices and methods used in managing projects. Project elements such as scheduling, organizing, implementing, control, and assessment will be discussed. The course focuses on using project management techniques appropriate for information systems projects. Prerequisite: MIS 360.

MIS 310. Mobile Application Development. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to application development for mobile devices. Students will learn about implementation, software design, and user-interaction design on the mobile computing platform. Students will also learn about concepts at the core of modern mobile computing, such as software and data distribution models and location awareness. The course focuses on using the iPhone OS as the development platform, but the concepts covered in the course apply to all mobile computing platforms. Students will be introduced to the swift programming language, the XCode programming environment, and the iPhone SDK and APIs.

MIS 360. Essentials of Management Information Systems. 3 Hours.

This course explores concepts of information systems management. Emphasis is placed on the theory and practice related to the development and operation of information systems in organizations. The course should be taken during the first year of enrollment.

MIS 362. Systems Analysis and Design. 3 Hours.

This is the study of the methodology for analysis and design of a business information system. Emphasis will be on critical analysis of existing systems and design of computer based systems. An actual systems analysis is required. Prerequisite: BCIS 1305.

MIS 430. Website Development. 3 Hours.

Students utilize coding and Web development tools to create inter-linked Web pages. Prerequisite: BCIS 1305.

MIS 450. Principles of Management Information Security. 3 Hours.

This course addresses aspects of information security. Topics include implications of databases, telecommunication systems, risk assessment, security policies, remote connections, authentication and prevention systems, foundations of cryptography, physical security issues, and appropriate counter measures. Reading and cases are used to increase depth of content and analytical perspective concerning law and ethics. Prerequisite: MIS 360.

MIS 489. Individual Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

MKT 300. Marketing the Organization. 1 Hour.

This course presents the concepts of marketing as it relates to organizations considering its nature, scope, elements, development, and the steps in the marketing planning process.

MKT 363. Marketing. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course in marketing presenting the basic components of marketing including product promotion, pricing, and distribution of goods and services with a set of controllable and non-controllable environmental forces.

MKT 366. Marketing Promotion. 3 Hours.

This course is an analysis of the promotion networks of business firms to external publics. Emphasis is on enabling the student to appraise their effectiveness as marketing tools and their social and economic significance. Prerequisite: MKT 363.

MKT 416. International Marketing. 3 Hours.

Students survey the economic, cultural, and political-legal environments in which international marketing takes place, and examine marketing functions and their adaptations to those environments.

MKT 436. Marketing Research. 3 Hours.

Techniques of marketing research, research design, analysis and interpretation of marketing data, questionnaire building, and sampling methods are covered in this course. Emphasis is given to selected applications of marketing research. Prerequisite: MKT 363.

MKT 445. Retailing. 3 Hours.

A study of managerial principles and practices of retail operations, this course covers store locations and layout, buying, pricing, promotion, services, and inventory control.

MKT 465. Sales Management. 3 Hours.

Policies, operation, coordination and control of marketing activities, with special emphasis on the selection and direction of sales personnel, are covered in this course.

MKT 467. Consumer Behavior. 3 Hours.

Students will examine the development of an accurate and comprehensive understanding of the consumer buying process and the important psychological variables that influence that process. Prerequisite: MKT 363.

MKT 489. Individual Study. 3 Hours.

This course provides individual instruction. Students may repeat the course when topics vary.

Faculty

Dr. Gary L. Stading

Dean-College of Business

Email: gstading@tamut.edu

Dr. Terry W. Bechtel

Professor

Email: terry.bechtel@tamut.edu

Dr. George M. Boger

Associate Professor

Email: george.boger@tamut.edu

Dr. Joan M. Brumm

Professor

Email: joan.brumm@tamut.edu

Dr. Larry Davis

Professor

Email: larry.davis@tamut.edu

Dr. James L. Harbin

Professor

Email: james.harbin@tamut.edu

Dr. Richard G. Herrera

Assistant Professor

Email: richard.herrera@tamut.edu

Dr. Patricia W. Humphrey

Professor

Email: patricia.humphrey@tamut.edu

Selena Jefferies

Instructor

Email: selena.jefferies@tamut.edu

Dr. Eric Kinnamon

Assistant Professor

Email: eric.kinnamon@tamut.edu

Dr. Charles L. McDonald

Professor

Email: charles.mcdonald@tamut.edu

Dr. James Nguyen

Associate Professor

Email: james.nguyen@tamut.edu

Dr. Robert Owen

Associate Professor

Email: robert.owen@tamut.edu

Dr. Richard Parsons

Assistant Professor

Email: richard.parsons@tamut.edu

Dr. David Reavis

Associate Professor

Email: david.reavis@tamut.edu